Bequest

Making a will allows you to determine how your assets will be used.  No matter how much you have, large or small, it can make a difference.  Please consider making a bequest in your will to the Brain Foundation. 

Download our Bequest Brochure

Leave A Bequest

What is a Bequest ?
How Your Bequest Helps Others
Your Will
Nominating How You Want Your Bequest to be Used
Recommended Wording for Your Will for a Bequest to the Brain Foundation

Making a will allows you to determine how your assets will be used.  No matter how much you have, large or small, it can make a difference.  Please consider making a bequest in your will to the Brain Foundation.

A bequest to the Brain Foundation can assist in our vital works towards reducing the incidence and impact of diseases, disorders and injuries of the brain, spinal cord and nervous system such as stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, brain tumour, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, head injury, vertigo, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, hydrocephalus and peripheral nerve disease.

To discuss making a bequest to the Brain Foundation, please contact Gerald Edmunds by phone 1300 886 660 or email us.

We can send you a bequest brochure that makes it easy to brief your solicitor or trustee company (such as Australian Executor Trustees Limited, www.aetlimited.com.au) by filling in the parts that show what you would like done.

The following information is provided to assist you in considering, or making, a bequest to the Brain Foundation.

What is a Bequest?

A bequest is an instruction you make in your will, directing that some or all of your estate be gifted to a charity or particular cause. It can be in the form of money, property, shares and debentures, works of art, or other valuables. You don’t have to be wealthy to make a bequest – whatever you choose to give will make a difference.

How Your Bequest Helps Others

The Foundation supports research into brain, spine, and nerve diseases, disorders and injuries – which affect one in five Australians. The Foundation also supports those affected by these conditions, through the provision of information, support and community education.

A bequest to the Brain Foundation will continue to help others for many years and ensure that you are well remembered.

Some examples of others have contributed to this vital work include:

  • Mrs Esther Hennessy had suffered from Parkinson’s disease for over 30 years.  Her will stated that the funds “be applied for research into the causes and treatment of Parkinson’s disease”, a cure for which has long eluded researchers. In 2001, interest earned on the bequest provided seed funding for a research program that has led to early success in developing a new diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s Disease, which will ultimately enable more accurate, earlier diagnoses to be made, ensuring that patients receive the most appropriate treatment as early as possible.
  • In memory of her husband Frank Young, who was left severely disabled by stroke for the last years of his life, Mrs Morfyn Young made a bequest to the Brain Foundation for research into the cause, prevention and treatment of stroke.
  • Mr Leonard Grant made a bequest to the Foundation in memory of his wife Audrey, who suffered peripheral neuropathy for many years. Audrey and Leonard’s legacy has enabled young neurologists like Dr Matthew Kiernan to purchase equipment that will help in his research into nerve dysfunction in kidney failure (See section on Brain Foundation 2002 Research Reports).
  • Bequests made for “research into brain diseases and disorders” by people such as Mr Noel Clifton, Mrs Kathleen Toy, Mrs Linda Turner, has enabled the Foundation to support the work of researchers like Dr Swee Aw, who is hoping to help the almost 2,500 patients treated at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Balance Disorder Unit with her research into balance disorders.

Your Will

Two out of five Australians die without a will (intestate). In New South Wales alone, in 2002, the Public Trustee handed to state revenue over $6 million in unclaimed monies from people who died intestate, or where the will was invalid, or where beneficiaries were unable to be located.

If you have assets of any value at all, people including relatives and friends and causes you care about, your Will is your final statement about how you wish those assets to be dispersed. A Will can protect those close to you from unnecessary conflict, expense, and legal problems in the event of your death. When you include a charitable bequest in your will, your legacy of care and concern lives on through the work of others.

If you wish to make a gift to the Brain Foundation in your Will, we would recommend that you obtain professional legal advice, so that the words accurately and validly record your wishes.

If you are giving to more than one charity or cause, it may be preferable to specify shares of the Estate rather than specific sums.

If you are comfortable with telling us that you have included us in your Will, we would appreciate the opportunity to thank you, whilst of course respecting your right to privacy.

Nominating How You Want Your Bequest to be Used

 

An option is for you to nominate the specific area of research where you would like your bequest directed, for example:

  • General Research
  • Stroke
  • Dementia / Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Head Trauma
  • Brain Tumours
  • Peripheral nerve disease
  • Genetic research – (Motor Neurone Disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease)

Recommended Wording for Your Will for a Bequest to the Brain Foundation

For a residual bequest:

“I EMPOWER my trustee(s) to convert into cash such assets as deemed necessary to facilitate the administration and distribution of my estate and on-going management of any investments which may be held in trust and to pay all just debts funeral and testamentary and administrative expenses applicable to my estate and I hereby bequeath the RESIDUE of my estate as may be real property, household and personal property of all kinds, investments and or cash to the Brain Foundation, ABN 47 008 479 936 for the general purpose of the foundation or the specific use stated: __________________________________”

For a cash bequest:

“I give free of all death duties, estate succession or otherwise, State or Federal, payable upon by reason of or in consequence of my death to the Brain Foundation, ABN 47 008 479 936, the sum of $__________ or ________ percentage / share of the cash component of my estate for the general purpose of the Foundation, or the specific use stated: ____________________”

For investments and property:

“I give free of all death duties, estate succession or otherwise, State or Federal, payable upon by reason of or in consequence of my death to the Brain Foundation, ABN 47 008 479 936.  Insert description of investment shares / bonds / insurance policy / goods & chattels / artworks and/or property:  _____________________ for the general purpose of the Foundation, or the specific use stated: _____________________”

Declaration:

“AND I DECLARE that the receipt of the Secretary, Treasurer or other proper Office of the Brain Foundation shall be full and sufficient discharge to my Trustee for the legacy and my Trustee shall not be responsible to see to the application of it.”

 

If you would like more information
please call the Chief Executive Officer, Gerald Edmunds
on 1300 886 660 for a Bequest Brochure.

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Events

Oct29

The Beautiful Minds Charity Ball

Sunshine Coast Function Centre By

A Black Tie Charity Ball fundraising for the Brain Foundation.  Sunshine Coast, QLD on 29
Oct29

2016 Melbourne Zombie Walk

Melbourne By

Saturday 29 October 2016 http://melbournezombiewalk.com